Restoring degraded natural forest in Tanzania’s coastal belt

Tree planting in Pugu
Restoring degraded natural forest in Tanzania
Coastal forests - Tanzania
Image Credit
Tree planting in Pugu © WWF

Objective 

Restoring degraded natural forest in Tanzania’s coastal belt.

Project description

The Kazimzumbwi Forest and the adjacent Pugu Forest Reserves are reportedly the remainders of one of the oldest surviving forests in the world. In the past (when forest was more extensive on the Pugu Hills) streams arising from the area used to supply all the water needed in Dar es Salaam.

As beautiful as it is Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve has been prone to human disturbances such as deforestation for pole and timber extraction, charcoal production, fire, animal trapping, cultivation and the presence of footpaths. Certain tree species have been targeted for pole and timber extraction, charcoal production and makonde carving. Important species such as Milicia excelsa and Dalbergia melanoxylon are now considered rare within the reserve. 

WWF Tanzania has partnered with Tanzania Forest Service and local communities to organise environmental education days to increase awareness of the importance of the forest for water catchment protection. Tree planting events are organised with local schools and community groups to restore important tree species to the degraded areas of the reserves. 

Restoration target

150 hectares restored over three years will result in a total of 150,000 trees. 

Learn more about Tanzania's coastal forests