People looing at plants in the forest ©WWF

What We Do

Trillion Trees aims to urgently speed up the protection and restoration of the world’s forests. On a massive scale.

We Work From The Ground Up

In forests.

We direct funds to crucial forest conservation projects across the world.


Backing science.

We support research into forest protection and the best ways to restore forests the right way.


Through politics.

We actively advocate for policy changes that value and prioritise forests and help end the drivers of deforestation.

Our Priorities For Maximum Impact

It’s clear that forest protection and restoration are vital and urgent. But they have to be science-led. Done efficiently, at scale and at speed. Time is running out.

The Trillion Trees priorities are:

1. To protect existing forests

Collaborating with local communities, governments and other organisations to expand protected areas, develop policy changes and create sustainable financing mechanisms. This can include ecotourism, training forest eco-guards, and supporting community management of land.

We know that the most effective way to protect forests is to get local communities involved; they benefit directly from the forests and are motivated to protect them.

2. To end deforestation

We tackle the causes of deforestation at its source, from government and corporate policies affecting forests through to community forest management. We actively support sustainable farming and agroforestry, while making sure local livelihoods sustainably benefit from any changes.

3. To restore forests

Restoration involves both tree planting and natural forest regeneration, depending on the local environment. We take a science-based approach to restoration, which requires a full understanding of environmental and social factors. Making sure the right trees are in the right places, for the right purpose. We are strong advocates for natural regeneration, because letting nature run its course, whether alone or with a little help, continually proves to be more effective in terms of both biodiversity and cost.